End of Key Stage 2

Statutory Assessment Tests (SATs)

 

What are SATs?

All state primary pupils in England are tested at the end of Key Stage 1 (year 2) and Key Stage 2 (year 6). Many schools also run 'unofficial' optional SATs in years 3 to 5 as well.
Year 6 children take their tests on set dates in mid-May. Results are then submitted to the school's local authority and to parents by the end of the summer term.

 

Which subjects are covered?

Year 6 children are tested in grammar, punctuation and spelling (known as the GPS test), reading and maths (with two reasoning and one arithmetic paper). Their writing is now assessed by the teacher rather than formally tested.

 

Will I be told the results?

Yes, by law parents must be given their children's results, broken down by subject, at the end of the summer term in years 2 and 6.

 

What sort of results will I be given?

At the end of year 6, now levels no longer exist, children will be given a raw score (Their mark on their paper: Reading: Out of 50; Maths: Out of 110; GPS: Out of 70), this wilol then be converted to a scaled score where 100 is seen as the average mark. Pupils who gain 100 will be awarded an 'At' for their age related expectations, pupils who score a scaled score of less than 100 will be given a 'Below' age related expectations and pupils scoring above 110 scaled score will be awarded 'Above' age related expectations. These results are then passed onto their high schools and these schools use them to set each child according to their abilities.  

 

How much do SATs matter?

Based on Year 6 SATs results, some secondary use levels achieved to set pupils as they move into Year 7 sets (others carry out their own testing). However, setting can and does change throughout secondary school, so please do not worry if your son or daughter does not achieve expected results in Y6 SATs.

 

Is there anything I can do to prepare my child?

You can help your child prepare for SATs by listening to them read regularly; asking them questions about what they have read and exposing them to a wide variety of texts at home.  It would also be beneficial to test your child regularly on their times tables (up to 12x12) and encourage them to participate in any homework or revision that is sent home from school.

 

They should also learn spellings regularly and practise these daily. They will need to practise Maths skills in context so anything from letting your child work out change when shopping, to helping a relative measure using centimetres and metres will help them see the importance of learning these key skills.

 

During SATs week it is essential that your child has a good nights sleep and is well rested each day. They should also have a healthy nutritious breakfast before they arrive at school.